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Risk Factors

Healthy lifestyle associated with lower risk of dementia independent of genetic risk, study finds

Following a healthy lifestyle is associated with a lower risk of dementia in cognitively healthy older adults at varying levels of genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, according to a study published online July 14 in JAMA. Funded in part by NIA, the study is the first to examine the relationship between multiple genetic risk factors for dementia and multiple lifestyle factors.

New Markers For Alzheimer's Disease Could Aid Diagnosis And Speed Up Drug Development

Alzheimer's disease begins altering the brain long before it affects memory and thinking.

So scientists are developing a range of tests to detect these changes in the brain, which include an increase in toxic proteins, inflammation and damage to the connections between brain cells.

Researchers Explore Why Women's Alzheimer's Risk Is Higher Than Men's

Scientists are beginning to understand why Alzheimer's disease affects more women than men and why the disease seems to progress more quickly in women's brains.

More studies seek people with mild cognitive impairment

In order to get ahead of Alzheimer’s disease earlier, more and more research studies are seeking people without changes to their memory and thinking along with those with a condition known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The question is, how do you know if you have it?

Boost brain health with a healthy diet - not supplements

A nutritious diet is a much better way to keep your brain healthy than dietary supplements. The Global Council on Brain Health recommends people be wary of supplements and always consult their doctor before taking them. Read more about their recommendations about dietary supplements.

Leading Researcher Weighs in on Lewy Body Dementia Versus Alzheimer’s

Imagine being told you are living with Alzheimer’s disease only to discover you have been misdiagnosed and are suffering from another neurodegenerative condition. At 52 years old, Mike Belleville was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s. Several years later, he was reevaluated and learned he has Lewy body dementia (LBD), a disease many researchers believe is the second most common form of dementia, affecting an estimated 1.3 million Americans. Belleville is among a number of people who have experienced the pain of misdiagnosis and are living with what the Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA) calls “the most misdiagnosed form of dementia.”

Primary care providers should screen seniors for decline in memory and thinking skills

The Alzheimer’s Association’s latest Facts and Figures report found most seniors are not evaluated for memory and thinking problems by their primary care providers. Learn more about the role these doctors can play in the early identification of cognitive decline and the importance of talking with your doctor if you have concerns.

So Far, Just One Thing Has 'Experimental Support' In Staving Off Alzheimer's

“I tell people to go to the gym three to four times a week if they want to prevent Alzheimer’s.” And that along with a healthy diet may well be all we have for now in the wake of so many failed attempts at treating or curing the disease. Still, scientists like Dr. R. Scott Turner, who directs the Memory Disorders Program at Georgetown University Medical Center, are far from giving up the fight.

Stay Physically Active

Physical activity is a valuable part of any overall body wellness plan and is associated with a lower risk of cognitive decline. If it’s safe for you, engage in cardiovascular exercise to elevate your heart rate. This will increase the blood flow to your brain and body, providing additional nourishment while reducing potential dementia risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol.

Physical activity and motor ability associated with better cognition in older adults, even with dementia

Encouraging evidence indicates that being more physically active is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease and a slower rate of cognitive decline in older adults. But it remains unclear exactly how physical activity lowers this risk for Alzheimer’s disease.