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Participants in Alzheimer’s study regain memory and thinking skills after study ends

The groundbreaking Generation Program gathered the world’s largest group of people at genetic risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease in later life to study a new treatment. However, the study was stopped early when participants developed subtle memory and thinking problems. Learn what scientists found four months after the study when they evaluated participants to see if memory and thinking skills returned to pre-trial levels.

Scientists study the link between the gut and Alzheimer’s disease

Is your gut trying to tell you something? The trillions of bacteria that live in our guts, called our microbiome, may impact the risk of memory and thinking problems. Scientists at the University of Wisconsin are studying a possible link between changes in the gut microbiome and Alzheimer’s disease.

Protecting the brain after surgery and hospitalization

Delirium is a serious condition causing a sudden change in thinking and behavior for almost half of people over 65 after a hospitalization. The Global Council on Brain Health offers recommendations to prevent delirium and preserve brain health for people having surgery or experiencing severe illness.

Two views on Alzheimer's biomarkers: Eyeing changes in vision or pupils

Findings in two separate NIA-funded papers focus on different ways to develop noninvasive, less expensive ways to detect very early-stage Alzheimer’s disease in cognitively healthy people. The studies suggest that changes in vision and pupil responses may be effective biomarkers for Alzheimer’s in those at greater risk for dementia.

Alzheimer's patients isolated due to coronavirus finding support in virtual therapy

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) was founded in 2002 with the goal of providing a community for individuals, families and caregivers affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. As coronavirus isolates millions of Americans across the country, the AFA is working harder than ever to ensure that some of our nation’s most vulnerable still have a support system.

Large-scale analysis links glucose metabolism proteins in the brain to Alzheimer’s disease biology

In the largest study to date of proteins related to Alzheimer’s disease, a team of researchers has identified disease-specific proteins and biological processes that could be developed into both new treatment targets and fluid biomarkers. The findings suggest that sets of proteins that regulate glucose metabolism, together with proteins related to a protective role of astrocytes and microglia — the brain’s support cells — are strongly associated with Alzheimer’s pathology and cognitive impairment.

Staying Engaged During Coronavirus Isolation: Home Therapeutic Activities for Individuals Living with Alzheimer’s Disease

As the Coronavirus outbreak forces many families to stay confined at home, the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) is providing families affected by Alzheimer’s disease with information about simple therapeutic activities they can do to keep their loved one engaged and active while at home.

Mild Behavioral Impairment Can Help Predict Alzheimer’s, According to Study

In the late 1890s, a railroad worker in Frankfurt Germany noticed that his wife, Auguste Deter, was behaving oddly. Gradually her anxiety and mood changes gave way to memory loss, delusions and other signs of dementia. Committed to an institution in the care of Dr. Alois Alzheimer, Deter became the first person diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. A new study establishes that even her subtle, early shifts in behavior —  mild behavioral impairment — were scientifically linked to what was to come.

More Evidence Mediterranean Diet Fights Cognitive Impairment

The next time you’re deciding between a halibut or a steak filet, there’s now one more reason to opt for fish over red meat. A new study published in Alzheimer’s and Dementia builds on past findings that lifestyle choices may help fight cognitive impairment and prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

‘A4’ Study Aims to Target Amyloid in the Earliest Stages of Alzheimer’s

Targeting beta-amyloid protein before symptoms of cognitive decline or Alzheimer’s appear is the goal of one trial out of the National Institute on Aging (NIA), which recently released its first data set from its prevention trial.