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Research

Your lifestyle can lower your dementia risk, even if you have high genetic risk, study says

A good diet and ample exercise don't just help your waistline. Healthy lifestyle factors may also help lower your risk of dementia, even if you have a higher genetic risk, according to a study published Sunday in the medical journal JAMA.

Is Aerobic Exercise The Right Prescription For Staving Off Alzheimer's?

Researchers are prescribing exercise as if it were a drug in a study that aims to see if it can prevent Alzheimer's disease.

More studies seek people with mild cognitive impairment

In order to get ahead of Alzheimer’s disease earlier, more and more research studies are seeking people without changes to their memory and thinking along with those with a condition known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The question is, how do you know if you have it?

Boost brain health with a healthy diet - not supplements

A nutritious diet is a much better way to keep your brain healthy than dietary supplements. The Global Council on Brain Health recommends people be wary of supplements and always consult their doctor before taking them. Read more about their recommendations about dietary supplements.

Leading Researcher Weighs in on Lewy Body Dementia Versus Alzheimer’s

Imagine being told you are living with Alzheimer’s disease only to discover you have been misdiagnosed and are suffering from another neurodegenerative condition. At 52 years old, Mike Belleville was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s. Several years later, he was reevaluated and learned he has Lewy body dementia (LBD), a disease many researchers believe is the second most common form of dementia, affecting an estimated 1.3 million Americans. Belleville is among a number of people who have experienced the pain of misdiagnosis and are living with what the Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA) calls “the most misdiagnosed form of dementia.”

Is There an Alzheimer’s Blood Test?

Could an Alzheimer’s blood test be in our near future? Short answer: possibly, yes.

Alzheimer's in extended family members increased risk of disease, study shows

It’s well established that having a parent or sibling with Alzheimer’s increases a person’s risk of developing the disease. A new, NIA-supported study shows that even in the absence of close family members with Alzheimer’s, having extended family members with the disease increased a person’s risk. The findings, published April 9 in Neurology, could have implications for assessing risk using a broader view of family history.

Alzheimer’s drugs cost seven times more than cancer drugs to develop

The last US-approved Alzheimer’s drug—which was a new package of two existing drugs in a single pill—received the green light in 2003. In the nearly two decades since, there have been countless failures to develop any new treatment for the most common form of dementia. 

Primary care providers should screen seniors for decline in memory and thinking skills

The Alzheimer’s Association’s latest Facts and Figures report found most seniors are not evaluated for memory and thinking problems by their primary care providers. Learn more about the role these doctors can play in the early identification of cognitive decline and the importance of talking with your doctor if you have concerns.