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Research shows intermittent fasting may prevent Alzheimer’s disease

Intermittent fasting is a popular option for weight loss. Scientists are now learning it may also be able to improve memory and thinking. Read more about potential option for delaying Alzheimer’s disease.

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have a new way to participate in Alzheimer’s studies

Minority groups have long been underrepresented to medical research, including studies for Alzheimer’s and related dementias. A new registry aims to change that. The CARE registry is enrolling Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to connect them to research in memory and thinking problems, aging and caregiving.

Alzheimer’s Prevention Registry wraps up 2020 and looks to 2021 for new study opportunities

Thank you for your continued support of our mission to end Alzheimer’s disease before losing another generation. As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited about the many new opportunities we foresee next year to participate in groundbreaking prevention research.

Where you live might influence your risk for Alzheimer’s disease

Could where you live have an impact on your risk for Alzheimer’s disease? A new study shows an association between where people live and their risk for having Alzheimer’s disease associated brain changes.

Music can have a profound impact on brain health

Music has been part of our lives since ancient times. Now, researchers are discovering the profound impact music can have on our minds and bodies. AARP and the Global Council on Brain Health just released a report on the positive role music plays in supporting brain health and overall well-being. Music has been part of our lives since ancient times. Now, researchers are discovering the profound impact music can have on our minds and bodies. AARP and the Global Council on Brain Health just released a report on the positive role music plays in supporting brain health and overall well-being. 

Participants in Alzheimer’s study regain memory and thinking skills after study ends

The groundbreaking Generation Program gathered the world’s largest group of people at genetic risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease in later life to study a new treatment. However, the study was stopped early when participants developed subtle memory and thinking problems. Learn what scientists found four months after the study when they evaluated participants to see if memory and thinking skills returned to pre-trial levels.

Coming soon - A simple blood test for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease

A promising new blood test to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease could soon be a reality. The test is highly accurate in detecting the disease and differentiating it from other causes of dementia. While not yet available for clinical use, the new test could be a game changer for diagnosing a disease that impacts the lives of millions of people around the globe.

Scientists study the link between the gut and Alzheimer’s disease

Is your gut trying to tell you something? The trillions of bacteria that live in our guts, called our microbiome, may impact the risk of memory and thinking problems. Scientists at the University of Wisconsin are studying a possible link between changes in the gut microbiome and Alzheimer’s disease.

Scientists study whether aspirin can reduce risk of dementia

Aspirin’s ability to reduce inflammation made it a useful tool in reducing the risk of repeat heart attack and stroke. Can it also reduce or prevent the inflammation in the brain often associated with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease? Read the findings of a five-year study on aspirin and dementia.

The Future of Medicine: A New Era for Alzheimer’s

It is time to start anew. More than a century after neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer gave the first scientific talk describing the disease that bears his name today, we have no good treatments for this thief of minds, and we certainly have no cure. Today 40 million to 50 million people worldwide suffer from Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. The drugs doctors have tried, aimed at a single type of lesion, have repeatedly and agonizingly fallen short. Now scientists are beginning to say it is high time for a fresh approach to the illness.