Prevention | Alzheimer's Prevention Registry

You are here

Prevention

ASU researcher studies menopause and memory loss

Women experience many symptoms during menopause which can include difficulty concentrating and memory loss.  Arizona State University researcher Dr. Bimonte-Nelson is studying the link between memory and thinking problems and the onset of menopause.

Does Prevagen, a Cognitive Health Supplement, Really Improve Memory?

Dietary supplements make up a ubiquitous, $40 billion industry. Some of the 50,000 different types of supplements out there claim to improve your mood, energy, vitamin levels and overall health. And some supplements, like Prevagen, bank on the population of people living with dementia or Alzheimer’s.

Migraines a risk factor for developing dementia and Alzheimer's, study suggests

Migraines could raise the risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers. The study published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry involved 679 people aged 65 or over in Canada, who didn't have dementia.

New Study Explores the Relationship Between Mental Cognition and Exercise

Exercise has long been known to provide a wealth of health benefits, both physical and mental. But a new study suggests that exercise can boost mental cognition immediately following the session.

Markers of abnormal liver function linked to Alzheimer's disease

Abnormal liver enzyme levels detected by commonly used blood tests may be linked to Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis and multiple biomarkers of the disease, according to a recent study. The findings were published July 31 in JAMA Network Open. Led by NIA-supported scientific teams at Duke University and Indiana University, the research was based on the rationale that abnormal changes in liver enzymes are associated with heart disease and metabolic disorders like diabetes, which are known risk factors for Alzheimer’s.

High Blood Pressure in Your 30s May Affect Your Brain, Increase Dementia Risk

High blood pressure is linked to a lot of common health problems, most notably stroke and heart disease. Scientists have also established a link between high blood pressure and increased dementia risk. But a new study finds that an uptick in blood pressure — even as early as your 30s — could lead to a higher dementia risk later on.

Napping more? That could be an early symptom of Alzheimer's, new study says

Increased, excessive napping could be an early warning of Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in August by the peer-reviewed journal Alzheimer's & Dementia.

Genes That Affect Brain’s Immune Cells May Increase Risk of Alzheimer’s

Scientists identified new genes that impact the brain’s immune cells and may contribute to the risk of developing early-onset or late-onset Alzheimer’s.

Intensive blood pressure control may slow age-related brain damage

In a nationwide study, researchers used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to scan the brains of hundreds of participants in the National Institutes of Health’s Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) and found that intensively controlling a person’s blood pressure was more effective at slowing the accumulation of white matter lesions than standard treatment of high blood pressure. The results complement a previous study published by the same research group which showed that intensive treatment significantly lowered the chances that participants developed mild cognitive impairment.

How Exercise Lowers the Risk of Alzheimer’s by Changing Your Brain

More and more studies are showing how regular exercise benefits the brain, and in particular, the aging brain. What’s less clear is how exactly exercise counters the cognitive decline that comes with aging and diseases like Alzheimer’s.