Prevention | Alzheimer's Prevention Registry

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Prevention

The Alzheimer’s Prevention Registry: A Large Internet-Based Participant Recruitment Registry to Accelerate Referrals to Alzheimer’s- Focused Studies

Recruitment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) focused studies, particularly prevention studies, is challenging due to the public’s lack of awareness about study opportunities coupled with studies’ inclusion and exclusion criteria, resulting in a high screen fail rate. 

Participants in Alzheimer’s study regain memory and thinking skills after study ends

The groundbreaking Generation Program gathered the world’s largest group of people at genetic risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease in later life to study a new treatment. However, the study was stopped early when participants developed subtle memory and thinking problems. Learn what scientists found four months after the study when they evaluated participants to see if memory and thinking skills returned to pre-trial levels.

Coming soon - A simple blood test for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease

A promising new blood test to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease could soon be a reality. The test is highly accurate in detecting the disease and differentiating it from other causes of dementia. While not yet available for clinical use, the new test could be a game changer for diagnosing a disease that impacts the lives of millions of people around the globe.

Scientists study the link between the gut and Alzheimer’s disease

Is your gut trying to tell you something? The trillions of bacteria that live in our guts, called our microbiome, may impact the risk of memory and thinking problems. Scientists at the University of Wisconsin are studying a possible link between changes in the gut microbiome and Alzheimer’s disease.

Scientists study whether aspirin can reduce risk of dementia

Aspirin’s ability to reduce inflammation made it a useful tool in reducing the risk of repeat heart attack and stroke. Can it also reduce or prevent the inflammation in the brain often associated with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease? Read the findings of a five-year study on aspirin and dementia.

Protecting the brain after surgery and hospitalization

Delirium is a serious condition causing a sudden change in thinking and behavior for almost half of people over 65 after a hospitalization. The Global Council on Brain Health offers recommendations to prevent delirium and preserve brain health for people having surgery or experiencing severe illness.

The Future of Medicine: A New Era for Alzheimer’s

It is time to start anew. More than a century after neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer gave the first scientific talk describing the disease that bears his name today, we have no good treatments for this thief of minds, and we certainly have no cure. Today 40 million to 50 million people worldwide suffer from Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. The drugs doctors have tried, aimed at a single type of lesion, have repeatedly and agonizingly fallen short. Now scientists are beginning to say it is high time for a fresh approach to the illness.

Caring for Persons with Alzheimer’s Disease Amid the COVID-19 Crisis

Living with Alzheimer’s or any form of dementia is difficult enough. Add the stress of a global pandemic to the mix and you’re bound to have a few more questions. We spoke with Lori Nisson, the Family & Community Services director at the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute to gain some insight for maintaining routine, connection and safety in unsettling times.

Two views on Alzheimer's biomarkers: Eyeing changes in vision or pupils

Findings in two separate NIA-funded papers focus on different ways to develop noninvasive, less expensive ways to detect very early-stage Alzheimer’s disease in cognitively healthy people. The studies suggest that changes in vision and pupil responses may be effective biomarkers for Alzheimer’s in those at greater risk for dementia.

Alzheimer's patients isolated due to coronavirus finding support in virtual therapy

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) was founded in 2002 with the goal of providing a community for individuals, families and caregivers affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. As coronavirus isolates millions of Americans across the country, the AFA is working harder than ever to ensure that some of our nation’s most vulnerable still have a support system.