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Prevention

Is There an Alzheimer’s Blood Test?

Could an Alzheimer’s blood test be in our near future? Short answer: possibly, yes.

Alzheimer's in extended family members increased risk of disease, study shows

It’s well established that having a parent or sibling with Alzheimer’s increases a person’s risk of developing the disease. A new, NIA-supported study shows that even in the absence of close family members with Alzheimer’s, having extended family members with the disease increased a person’s risk. The findings, published April 9 in Neurology, could have implications for assessing risk using a broader view of family history.

Primary care providers should screen seniors for decline in memory and thinking skills

The Alzheimer’s Association’s latest Facts and Figures report found most seniors are not evaluated for memory and thinking problems by their primary care providers. Learn more about the role these doctors can play in the early identification of cognitive decline and the importance of talking with your doctor if you have concerns.

So Far, Just One Thing Has 'Experimental Support' In Staving Off Alzheimer's

“I tell people to go to the gym three to four times a week if they want to prevent Alzheimer’s.” And that along with a healthy diet may well be all we have for now in the wake of so many failed attempts at treating or curing the disease. Still, scientists like Dr. R. Scott Turner, who directs the Memory Disorders Program at Georgetown University Medical Center, are far from giving up the fight.

It seems like Alzheimer's but peek into the brain shows a mimic

Some people told they have Alzheimer’s may instead have a newly identified mimic of the disease — and scientists say even though neither is yet curable, it’s critical to get better at telling different kinds of dementia apart.

Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials Consortium Selects Elenbecestat and BAN2401 for Upcoming Clinical Studies on Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease

The Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials Consortium (ACTC) and Eisai Co., Ltd. (Headquarters: Tokyo, CEO: Haruo Naito, “Eisai”) announced today that the investigational oral BACE (beta amyloid cleaving enzyme) inhibitor elenbecestat (development code: E2609) and the investigational anti-amyloid beta (Aβ) protofibril antibody BAN2401, which are currently being evaluated as treatments for early Alzheimer’s disease (AD), have been selected by the ACTC as treatments to be evaluated in upcoming clinical studies targeting primary prevention (A3 Study) and secondary prevention (A45 Study) of AD. These studies will be conducted with funding from various sources including the United States National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, and Eisai.

Stay Physically Active

Physical activity is a valuable part of any overall body wellness plan and is associated with a lower risk of cognitive decline. If it’s safe for you, engage in cardiovascular exercise to elevate your heart rate. This will increase the blood flow to your brain and body, providing additional nourishment while reducing potential dementia risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol.

Physical activity and motor ability associated with better cognition in older adults, even with dementia

Encouraging evidence indicates that being more physically active is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease and a slower rate of cognitive decline in older adults. But it remains unclear exactly how physical activity lowers this risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Aging baby boomers are about to push Alzheimer's disease rates sky high

She had researched Alzheimer's disease and its effects on the brain for years, but it wasn't until her own mother's memory began to slip that Dr. Eva Feldman, a University of Michigan neurologist, truly grasped how devastating the disease is.