Lifestyle | Alzheimer's Prevention Registry

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Improving your sleep and other lifestyle factors are keys to better brain health

Sleep is your body’s way of restoring vital organs including the brain. When sleep is elusive over long periods of time, research shows it can increase the risk of dementia and cognitive decline. You can reduce your risk by improving your sleep habits and addressing other lifestyle factors such as physical activity, diet, social engagement and smoking cessation. Read more about how to improve these aspects of your lifestyle.

COVID-19 infection can harm the brain

Researchers are finding COVID-19 can significantly impact the brain. From neurological symptoms to mental well-being, the virus is taking a toll on the brain. In a new report the Global Council on Brain Health offers recommendations to safeguard your brain health during the pandemic.

Research shows intermittent fasting may prevent Alzheimer’s disease

Intermittent fasting is a popular option for weight loss. Scientists are now learning it may also be able to improve memory and thinking. Read more about potential option for delaying Alzheimer’s disease.

Where you live might influence your risk for Alzheimer’s disease

Could where you live have an impact on your risk for Alzheimer’s disease? A new study shows an association between where people live and their risk for having Alzheimer’s disease associated brain changes.

Music can have a profound impact on brain health

Music has been part of our lives since ancient times. Now, researchers are discovering the profound impact music can have on our minds and bodies. AARP and the Global Council on Brain Health just released a report on the positive role music plays in supporting brain health and overall well-being. Music has been part of our lives since ancient times. Now, researchers are discovering the profound impact music can have on our minds and bodies. AARP and the Global Council on Brain Health just released a report on the positive role music plays in supporting brain health and overall well-being. 

Participants in Alzheimer’s study regain memory and thinking skills after study ends

The groundbreaking Generation Program gathered the world’s largest group of people at genetic risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease in later life to study a new treatment. However, the study was stopped early when participants developed subtle memory and thinking problems. Learn what scientists found four months after the study when they evaluated participants to see if memory and thinking skills returned to pre-trial levels.

Scientists study the link between the gut and Alzheimer’s disease

Is your gut trying to tell you something? The trillions of bacteria that live in our guts, called our microbiome, may impact the risk of memory and thinking problems. Scientists at the University of Wisconsin are studying a possible link between changes in the gut microbiome and Alzheimer’s disease.

Scientists study whether aspirin can reduce risk of dementia

Aspirin’s ability to reduce inflammation made it a useful tool in reducing the risk of repeat heart attack and stroke. Can it also reduce or prevent the inflammation in the brain often associated with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease? Read the findings of a five-year study on aspirin and dementia.

Protecting the brain after surgery and hospitalization

Delirium is a serious condition causing a sudden change in thinking and behavior for almost half of people over 65 after a hospitalization. The Global Council on Brain Health offers recommendations to prevent delirium and preserve brain health for people having surgery or experiencing severe illness.

Alzheimer's patients isolated due to coronavirus finding support in virtual therapy

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) was founded in 2002 with the goal of providing a community for individuals, families and caregivers affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. As coronavirus isolates millions of Americans across the country, the AFA is working harder than ever to ensure that some of our nation’s most vulnerable still have a support system.