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Report: Sustaining healthy brain behaviors requires individual and community commitment

In its annual report, the Global Council on Brain Health and AARP brought together experts from around the world to discuss how society can do more to promote activities to support healthy brains as we age. Read what they have to say about how individuals and communities can motivate people to maintain brain-healthy lifestyles. 

Alzheimer’s Prevention Registry wraps up 2021 and looks to 2022 for new study opportunities

Thank you for your continued support of our mission to end Alzheimer’s disease before losing another generation. As 2021 comes to a close, we are excited about the many new opportunities we foresee next year to participate in groundbreaking prevention research.

Digital devices and artificial intelligence partner to measure early brain changes

Smartphones and smartwatches already measure our heart rate, sleep patterns and oxygen levels. These and other so-called digital biomarkers coupled with artificial intelligence could one day soon identify early memory and thinking changes to help us optimize our brain health.

Improving your sleep and other lifestyle factors are keys to better brain health

Sleep is your body’s way of restoring vital organs including the brain. When sleep is elusive over long periods of time, research shows it can increase the risk of dementia and cognitive decline. You can reduce your risk by improving your sleep habits and addressing other lifestyle factors such as physical activity, diet, social engagement and smoking cessation. Read more about how to improve these aspects of your lifestyle.

COVID-19 infection can harm the brain

Researchers are finding COVID-19 can significantly impact the brain. From neurological symptoms to mental well-being, the virus is taking a toll on the brain. In a new report the Global Council on Brain Health offers recommendations to safeguard your brain health during the pandemic.

Research shows intermittent fasting may prevent Alzheimer’s disease

Intermittent fasting is a popular option for weight loss. Scientists are now learning it may also be able to improve memory and thinking. Read more about potential option for delaying Alzheimer’s disease.

Where you live might influence your risk for Alzheimer’s disease

Could where you live have an impact on your risk for Alzheimer’s disease? A new study shows an association between where people live and their risk for having Alzheimer’s disease associated brain changes.

Music can have a profound impact on brain health

Music has been part of our lives since ancient times. Now, researchers are discovering the profound impact music can have on our minds and bodies. AARP and the Global Council on Brain Health just released a report on the positive role music plays in supporting brain health and overall well-being. Music has been part of our lives since ancient times. Now, researchers are discovering the profound impact music can have on our minds and bodies. AARP and the Global Council on Brain Health just released a report on the positive role music plays in supporting brain health and overall well-being. 

Participants in Alzheimer’s study regain memory and thinking skills after study ends

The groundbreaking Generation Program gathered the world’s largest group of people at genetic risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease in later life to study a new treatment. However, the study was stopped early when participants developed subtle memory and thinking problems. Learn what scientists found four months after the study when they evaluated participants to see if memory and thinking skills returned to pre-trial levels.

Scientists study the link between the gut and Alzheimer’s disease

Is your gut trying to tell you something? The trillions of bacteria that live in our guts, called our microbiome, may impact the risk of memory and thinking problems. Scientists at the University of Wisconsin are studying a possible link between changes in the gut microbiome and Alzheimer’s disease.