Caregiving | Alzheimer's Prevention Registry

You are here

Caregiving

Caring for Persons with Alzheimer’s Disease Amid the COVID-19 Crisis

Living with Alzheimer’s or any form of dementia is difficult enough. Add the stress of a global pandemic to the mix and you’re bound to have a few more questions. We spoke with Lori Nisson, the Family & Community Services director at the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute to gain some insight for maintaining routine, connection and safety in unsettling times.

Alzheimer's patients isolated due to coronavirus finding support in virtual therapy

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) was founded in 2002 with the goal of providing a community for individuals, families and caregivers affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. As coronavirus isolates millions of Americans across the country, the AFA is working harder than ever to ensure that some of our nation’s most vulnerable still have a support system.

Lori Nisson: How to Create a Caregiving Plan for COVID-19

As COVID-19 continues to spread, particularly hitting vulnerable populations like elderly in nursing homes, caregiving for a loved one with dementia may feel overwhelming. But creating a plan to manage themselves and their loved ones during the pandemic can help.

Primary care doctors expect to see increase in patients with dementia in next five years

More than 5 million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and the number is expected to rise as high as 13.8 million by 2050. Yet, according to the latest Alzheimer’s Association Facts and Figures report, half of all primary care physicians feel the medical community is not prepared to meet the demand. Learn more about the projected incidence of Alzheimer’s dementia and the burden it places on caregivers and the health care system.

Alzheimer’s and its impact on the African-American community

Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that usually starts slowly and gradually worsens over time. It is the cause of 60-70% of cases of dementia. In most cases, remembering recent events is one of the earliest symptoms. A disease in the brain, the onset usually occurs in patients over the age of 65 but can occur earlier. Alzheimer’s is one of the most financially costly diseases.

In the Family: A Caregiver’s Mission to Fight Alzheimer’s

Jacquelyn Patterson has a family history of Alzheimer’s disease. She lost both of her parents and 10 of her aunts to Alzheimer’s and dementia. And she is currently providing care for three of her own sisters who are living with dementia.

This Eye Scan Could Detect Alzheimer’s in Seconds

It sounds like a science fiction movie: an eye scan that can provide information about your brain, and, quite possibly, your future. But according to two new studies, it could be a very real possibility soon.

Seniors and hobbies

A study by AARP and Banner Alzheimer’s Institute looks at the best ways for seniors to increase memory and brain power. 

Meaning & Purpose

Planning activities for a person with dementia, if you are the primary caregiver, can be a daunting task with everything else you have on your plate.  Activities are an incredibly important aspect of quality of life, and unfortunately, the person’ ability to initiate and engage in activities that bring meaning and purpose, will decline as the dementia progresses.  Though hugely important, getting a person with dementia involved in activities can be a challenging endeavor.  However, incorporating specific strategies can make it a bit easier on you and your person.  As wit