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Executive Committee Member has High Hopes for Research

We are very excited about all the studies coming up this year and the work we are doing at the Alzheimer's Prevention Registry.

With the world of Alzheimer's research changing rapidly, we are fortunate to have many top-caliber scientists and experts on its executive committee, including Jeffrey Cummings, M.D., Sc.D. Dr. Cummings is the Director of the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas, Nevada and Cleveland, Ohio. He is very excited to be part of the Registry.

"The API is one of the most exciting research projects in the Alzheimer arena at this time. It combines genetics, imaging, prevention, and therapeutics in a forward-looking way. It is inspirational science," Dr. Cummings said. "We all need to do our part to support this and I can help by being on the Executive Committee."

"A positive trial would validate amyloid as a target and monoclonal antibodies as a viable therapeutic approach," Dr. Cummings said.

As the leader of the crenezumab in late-onset Alzheimer's disease study, Dr. Cummings is positive about the potential of this agent for patients in the earliest phases of the disease such as those include in the API Colombian study.

In Alzheimer's research, Dr. Cummings is pleased to see the breakthroughs in pre-symptomatic diagnosis and advance therapy. He is excited about upcoming studies, such as the A4 and others that share aspects of prevention.

He is also excited about EnVivo's COGNITIV AD trial of encenicline, as he notes it has one of the most positive Phase 2 platforms on which to build a Phase 3 program.

"A positive trial would put the company in position to get a new medication to patients in a relatively near-term time horizon," Dr. Cummings said.

For families who are currently battling Alzheimer's, he recommends finding the best care available delivered by experts in a supportive patient centered environment.

"Find a knowledgeable doctor who has access to a team of people who can help," Dr. Cummings said.